Right place…

right time.DSC_9126.jpgHe is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.

Socrates

I had a special treat this week-end while visiting one of my favorite places, Schweitzer Mountain. The landscape was filled with bear-grass, a member of the lily family, in bloom, an occurrence that only happens every 5-7 years. Each plant only stays in bloom for a few days so photographing this is something that you need to take advantage of on the day that you see it.

As we walked amongst the blooms the air was filled with its faint fragrance and I felt that sense of satisfaction of being in the right place, at the right time, taking in the wealth of nature.

Winter…

I couldn’t love you more!

dsc_8119

It’s an illusion that photos are made with the camera….they are made with the eye, heart and head.

Henri Cartier Bresson

Some week-ends are perfect.

Single digit temperatures, sunshine, glittering snow.

A great friend, a great meal, a great evening with Viggo Mortensen.

Perfect light for perfect photoshoots.

Nature at her absolute best and painting exquisite intimate landscapes upon the canvas’ that I presented to her.

Winter…the most beautiful of seasons.

Happy…

New Year!

dsc_0010-2For last year’s words belong to last year’s language. And next year’s words await another voice. And to make an end is to make a beginning.

T.S. Eliot

Thanks to all of you who follow my blog, it is most certainly a highlight of my week.

I hope that 2017 brings you everything that you hope for and some unexpected joys as well.

Stay safe, be well, and keep capturing the moments of your life.

Cheers…

Two years…

of weekly blogging.

dsc_5730-2Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering, ‘It will be happier.’

Alfred Lord Tennyson

A beautiful day with frigid temperatures and a fine way to end my second year of blogging.

I set a goal for myself two years ago to write a weekly blog post on photography. I wanted it to focus mainly on creativity and inspiration and highlight an image preferably from that week.

It’s now two years later and this year was for me filled with ups and downs and I know that I’m not alone in that.

Highlights and lowlights…rather ironic considering that they’re two of my favorite things.

Some of the best highlights?

Photographing a proton arc during a night of northern lights, in one word…unforgettable.

Photographing rare halos and having the most incredible e-mail conversation with a renowned physicist.

Numerous publications and an Image of the Day by Earthsky.org.

An abundance of canine photo shoots, so dear to my heart.

The lowlights? Frankly I’m just going to visualize whirled peas and leave it at that.

I’ve got a new project starting and can’t wait to immerse myself in it.

Don’t forget to take some moments for yourself during this busy time of year and find something positive to focus on…

Sheer beauty…

in a fragile package.

dsc_7294…the endless repetition of an ordinary miracle.

Orhan Pamuk, Snow

Winter is fast approaching and it does bring its challenges but for me it is one of the most beautiful and picturesque times of year.

I love an opportunity to photograph nature as it appears, these tiny intimate landscapes that are so often overlooked. When you find something this transient that you’d like to photograph, get your shot because this type of subject matter doesn’t linger, but then move around and look at it from different angles. Simply changing your position can make a huge difference with the available light and composition.

In the eyes of those who only see snow as something to be endured perhaps take a moment next time it is falling and appreciate its fragility and uniqueness.

Vapor condensing onto dust particles in the atmosphere…a gift from nature.

 

My day went to the dogs…

and was filled with great moments.

dsc_3039-2Life rarely presents fully finished photographs. An image evolves, often from a single strand of visual interest – a distant horizon, a moment of light, a held expression.

Sam Abell

Yesterday was one of those perfect photographic days that for me was so centering.

It started out with a photo shoot of one of my absolute favorite subjects…dogs. The energy was great, the dogs exuded canine joy, and there was even a little break in the constant rain that couldn’t have been better timed.

As the sun began to sink lower on the horizon, cirrus clouds appeared and I had another treat following my theme for the day…parhelia or sundogs.

Jumping in my Jeep I headed off to see what might develop as the hexagonal ice plates drifted high in the sky, nearly horizontal to the horizon.

As I watched, a circumzenithal arc appeared above the sundogs, lasting only for a brief moment. I shot from several different angles and in today’s shot thought that I’d throw out that you don’t always have to have a straight horizon, sometimes it’s fun to deliberately tilt the camera, Dutch tilt, more often used in cinematography.

Life is about moments and today was filled with them.

Where will you find yours this week-end?

Rain soaked…

and searching for moments.

dsc_2282-editIt is not enough to photograph the obviously picturesque.

Dorothea Lange

This quote really resonated with me. I think we are inundated with beautiful images and while I can appreciate that beauty, it takes far more than saturation to make me want to look twice or even remember that image.

We have had one of the rainiest months on record and it has taken some doing to watch for moments that isolate themselves from utter grayscapes.

Even the clouds have not been cooperative deigning only to show solid overcoats of smooth gray until this morning…

I am reminded of a book I’m reading whose main character is a photographer. She goes out to shoot a sunrise and takes 400 images. Unless you’re doing a startrail, timelapse, or shooting a burst for an action shot I can’t imagine why a person would want to take that many images of a single subject and then have to search through those later for the image that captures it. I would feel like I wasn’t really being present in that moment and looking beyond the obviously picturesque.

My question is just because it’s digital does that mean that we should be less thoughtful about the shots that we take? Would your photography improve if you treated it more like film?