Winter…

winds.

black and white landscape with snow and blowing wind

This world is but a canvas to our imagination.

Henry David Thoreau

The wind chill was -29 degrees Celsius, -20 Farenheit. Bitterly cold and bone chilling but as we descended into the valley I couldn’t resist jumping out to capture this minimalist landscape.

The hills were reminiscent of waves and I was reminded of my times at sea. Only during winter could a prairie landscape take on the characteristics of the ocean.

Nature is amazing…make time for it.

Pheasant…

in the snow.

What’s really important is to simplify. The work of most photographers would be improved immensely if they could do one thing: get rid of the extraneous. If you strive for simplicity, you are more likely to reach the viewer.

William Albert Allard

One of the reasons that I absolutely love winter photography! It’s like having a clean canvas, uncluttered and primed.

Today was bitterly cold with periods of heavy snow but it was also the perfect day to spot pheasants: often overlooked as they blend so easily into ground vegetation.

Freezing fingers, wet gear…all so worth it! I believe that’s part of the magic of photography. Heading outdoors with no expectations and finding a little magic somewhere.

And tired out dogs…that’s a good thing too.

What?? Dale Chihuly…

in Waterton?

Choose only one master-nature.

Rembrandt

Some weeks are tougher than others and it’s hard to not take on what others may be going through. With that in mind today called for a road trip and as always we were not disappointed.

Some of you know me from my past life as a glass artist. My years of learning the technical side of product photography, when I had to photograph my glass for exhibit entries, reminded me of just how much I loved photography and nature, so I followed my heart and packed up my glass for good.

Today was a reminder of that past life after the right combination of wind and freezing temperatures created a glass sculpture like effect upon the shores of Waterton Lake in Alberta, Canada. Dale Chihuly is an American glass sculpture artist and much of his work lies in environmental artwork.

I remain in awe of what nature creates and today was one of those memorable ones that reminds me that it’s almost always about the water.

Kelvin Helmholtz…

waves in the sky.

kelvin helmholts clouds waves in the sky

The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider’s web.

Pablo Picasso

They call them the holy grail of the cloud spotter, one of the rarest and most fleeting of cloud formations.

Something must be right in my world because this is my 6th documented photograph of these wave like clouds this year!

It’s funny how something so small can make me so happy and I think “Again, I saw them again!”

Anywhere…

the wind blows.

All the lessons are in nature. You look at the way rocks are formed – the wind and the water hitting them, shaping them, making them what they are. Things take time, you know?

Diane Lane

I love this time of year when the seasons change from day to day; one moment is fall, the next winter.

This was taken the morning of the Autumnal Equinox when the length of day and night was almost equal.

The rock lover in me could not get enough of these sandstone sculptures in this magical place.

Take time to get out in nature. I guarantee it will give you a new perspective on life.

Human nature…

and the capacity for change.

People remain what they are even if their faces fall apart. Bertolt Brecht

He loves my work, just not the dead stuff.

We converse about human nature and whether or not there exists somewhere deep, the ability to change.

I don’t think so.

I do know that as important as it is to capture moments of beauty, the darker storytelling moments matter too.

It would seem the more that I try to understand human nature the less that I do.

He loves my work, just not the dead stuff.

Looking to find your voice…

in photography?

The deeper the blue becomes, the more strongly it calls man towards the infinite, awakening in him a desire for the pure and, finally, for the supernatural… The brighter it becomes, the more it loses its sound, until it turns into silent stillness and becomes white.

Wassily Kandinsky

I’m not the kind of girl that falls for pastel shades of barely there color. If I’m going to stray from my beloved monochromatic it’s going to be with an intensely bold yet limited color palette.

It’s important to know what you like and to seek it out. One of the best ways to find your voice as an artist is to build some galleries of your work; group them and see how they fit together. Sometimes images fit together for unexpected reasons and others stand alone lacking any common thread. Look for commonalities in focal lengths, color, composition, and theme. What other things can you see that work together as a group? This is an extremely insightful exercise that can tell you a lot about yourself and the direction that you’re going.

Years ago I came to the realization that I couldn’t spend my creative time in a studio setting so I took the technical skills that I’d learned while photographing my kiln formed glass and headed outdoors. I credit a wonderful painter/mentor with forcing me to confront the landscape. It forever changed my direction in photography. (Thank you, Nan!)

Re-visit familiar places, photograph them again, and listen quietly for the voice of the landscape.