Shot from the heart…

as expected, in black and white.

Fourth of July
Fourth of July

“I’ve been forty years discovering that the Queen of all colors is black.”

Henri Matisse

I did warn you in last week’s post. What can I say? I love the clarity that comes with black and white. While others are anticipating a riot of colors bursting into the night sky I see a hazy red blur that is much better defined without the color.

I do love an opportunity to shoot fireworks. There is such an element of surprise as to what you might see. Each time I do it I find myself more relaxed and able to take in the show at the same time as I am photographing it. I was even able to ignore the popping of flashes behind me with hardly an eye-roll as the other spectators  attempted to capture this on various flash equipped devices.

I found this to be almost meditative too as I calculated how long to leave the shutter open and envisioned what elements I was building into each frame. Would it be one singular explosion or a longer shot enveloping multiple explosions?!

Fourth of July

Fourth of July

For those disappointed by these black and white images I offer this as an opportunity to imagine all the colors of the rainbow. Whatever colors your heart may desire…and a happy independence day America!

The journey of an artist…

follows neither a straight nor an easy path…

morning fog
morning fog

Nothing is ever the same twice because everything is always gone forever, and yet each moment has infinite photographic possibilities.

Michael Kenna

Tempting as it may be to shoot things like heavily saturated sunsets that draw gasps of delight from the general public I think it is important to stay true to what you personally find to be moving. If you sacrifice that inner voice, your own personal je ne sais quoi in the hopes of a sale, you will lose the joy that comes with picking up a camera.

It’s strange but when I find myself editing an image with just the smallest of adjustments using an almost exaggerated light touch I know that the image holds more meaning for me.

Likewise when I see the work of another photographer and it makes me hold my breath even for a moment I know that their work has resonated with me and it then becomes important to find out why.

Michael Kenna is one such artist who when I happened upon his work it was like time stood still. So many of his images were utterly simple and at the same time complex in their composition and tone.

30 seconds one evening
30 seconds one evening

I battle with color and sensory overload at the best of times so I do find myself drawn to black and white. As a young girl I was petrified of the dark with its enveloping blackness and things that might lurk in those shadows. Never one to give in to irrational fears I pushed myself to be in that darkness and I have found it to be meditative and calming in a world that has exploded with connectivity. Now I find myself more often than not, waiting for the sun to go down so that I can explore the night using long exposures. Certainly not something that I would ever have imagined doing but if you are willing to try new things and keep an open mind, you might find your journey taking a new direction.

I do still shoot color but I find myself doing so less and less and when I look back on photographers whose work really moves me, it is almost always minimalist and black and white.

For me it is about being authentic in your work and presenting an image that is true to your own personal vision and this year as I shoot the fireworks to celebrate America’s day of Independence they will more than likely be in black and white…

Happy Fourth of July to those celebrating…

Missed seeing the aurora borealis again…

or did you?!

aurora borealis
aurora borealis

The job of the artist is to create mystery.

Francis Bacon

Did I ever chuckle when I came across this quote. Busted! Read on to see what a secretive lot we photographers can be!

This is my longest blog post to date BUT if you have ever been disappointed by NOT seeing the northern lights when others have raved about or captured fabulous images of them AND you live below 50 degrees latitude…read on!

If you can tolerate the ground-work laying information in the next couple of paragraphs without your eyes rolling back in your head I will then get to why you may have seen the aurora borealis and not even known it!

Trending this past week were photos of the aurora borealis dancing in the night skies over North America and other parts of the world as well. There are people FAR more adept at explaining what these light displays are but basically it begins with a CME or coronal mass ejection. This is a cloud of gas ejected from the surface of the Sun. When these winds of charged particles collide with Earth’s magnetic field it excites those atoms causing them to light up.

For viewing purposes the important thing to know is the global geomagnetic storm index or KP number and it ranges from 0-9, with 9 being the highest. Using this number enables you to see if there is a possibility of seeing the aurora in your location. Spaceweatherlive.com is a wealth of information on this number and how to find your value.

Back to the photos…

This week I saw some very beautiful images of the northern lights shot during the early hours of June 23, 2015. The KP index was predicted to be between 7 and 8 and for my viewing purposes in Northern Idaho, I need between a 5 and 6 to give me a good chance of seeing lights. The evening did not disappoint and along with the greens I captured with my Nikon some lovely spiking pinks dance across the night sky along the edge of my pasture. I am fortunate to live in a place with dark skies and little light pollution which greatly improves the chance of seeing these.

You might have noticed that I did not say that along with the greens I saw some lovely spiking pinks.

What my eyes saw when I walked outside was this..

aurora borealis
aurora borealis

but I knew that what I was seeing was the northern lights because of a chance discovery that I blogged about in March here.

I suppose it is the job of the artist to create mystery but I have read too many comments from people bitterly disappointed after getting up to witness this altogether infrequent sight at my latitude to NOT provide an explanation and hope to those who have seeing this on their bucket list.

I grew up in Edmonton, Alberta, latitude 53 degrees, and recall seeing the aurora borealis in all of its colorful glory. After many years away in more southerly climes we moved north once again to Idaho, latitude 48 degrees.

I was puzzled and disappointed that while others were out in my same area capturing beautiful northern lights shots…I never once saw them but I was looking for color. After my March discovery thorough research into this showed me that the human eye uses rods and cones. In the retina cones perceive color, work in bright light, and are used in the day. Rods perceive light and shadow and are used at night. Camera sensors in the DSLR’s do not have these limitations so they capture the full range of color and light.

The simple explanation is as you go below 50 degrees latitude, the northern lights are weaker and will to most people be viewed more as shifting patterns of light in the white to gray range and NOT the colors that the DSLR is capable of capturing. I would expect that eyes differ so possibly and depending on KP strength some people might still see some color. Travelling further north will diminish the differences between what your eyes see and what the camera captures.

The next time the KP index is high head out away from the city lights and enjoy searching the night sky and if you see dancing patterns and sheets of light you will have watched the aurora borealis!

 

Drawn to the simplicity…

of this rural farming scene.

20150611-DSC_5197-Edit
farming

Simplicity is the glory of expression.

Walt Whitman

I would have loved the opportunity to move around and set up the perfect composition for this shot but sometimes you just come upon something that grabs your attention.

With the rapidly sinking sun I had but a moment to get this shot and something about its simplicity appeals to me. It’s not a grand bridge, a lone tree or a craggy mountain backlit by the sun; some of the things I would ordinarily seek out for a sunset.

It’s just the end of the day in a farming community where the days are long and success depends on the vagaries of nature.

Scenes like this one remind me to be grateful that I live in a country with vast, beautiful open spaces where every inch is not covered in concrete. As the light faded and the temperature cooled I was left only with the sound of grains rustling in the faint breeze and small creatures settling in for the evening…

sim·plic·i·ty
[sim-plis-i-tee]
clear and uncomplicated.

When I look at his expression…

it makes me smile.

20140726-DSC_9222-Edit

To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless march.

Susan Sontag

I think that one of the most challenging niches in photography would be that of the portrait photographer. There is an immediacy to the shots and certainly an extra layer of difficulty added simply by the challenge to produce shots that are pleasing and flattering to the subject. I much prefer the candid shots.

Those that know me know that if my camera is not already at hand, it is very, very close! That often gives me the opportunity to steal a quick, relaxed shot like this one of a friend’s husband when they came to visit.

I began thinking about this after a conversation with another photographer friend. While on a recent trip she opted to leave her DSLR out of the mix and use her phone camera because she felt that she was missing too much.

It was an interesting thought and one that I have considered from time to time but the anxiety of not having at least the bare minimum of gear with me fills me with dread. Also in my thoughts were as someone who photographs every day and uses multiple lenses, I am able to dial in a quick shot almost at the same time that I am raising the camera to my eye. How long would it take before those combinations of numbers did not come so easily to mind when going for that quick, in the moment shot?

I leave you with this thought…they say that we have five senses but like me, has your camera become an additional ‘sense’ for you?

Passing judgement…

based on appearance.

barred
barred

Prejudice is a great time saver. You can form opinions without having to get the facts.

E. B. White

I have always had a passion for dogs and have lived with them for most of my life. Photographing them can be challenging but when it comes together naturally it’s a beautiful thing!

Several of the breeds that I have owned frequently land between the pages of Breed Specific Legislation. That poorly thought out, often contentious piece of appearance based legislation that targets a growing list of dog breeds purely on how they look. If your breed isn’t on it, don’t be too complacent, once in place it has the capability of quietly growing.

As a photographer and owner of Staffordshire Bull Terriers, I am very conscious of the images that I share of this breed; always scrutinizing them for what someone might ‘see’ in them and choose to tagline as vicious. She could be running joyfully towards me with that ‘grin’ that all owners of this breed recognize but to the uneducated or the one with an agenda, publishing that image might just add fuel to the fire when taken out of context. It is unfathomable to me that there are cities in this country and in the one to my North, where should I venture into those places with this dog, she could actually be confiscated. Did I mention that in England they are called the Nanny Dog, they are especially good with children and that this particular dog lives with a fluffy white kitty?

On this day she sat quietly watching me as sunlight streamed through the wooden blinds and calling out a quick ‘stay’ I reached for my camera which is always close at hand. For me it was a moment that captured the look of prejudice and each time I see it I am compelled to remember never to judge a book by its cover.

Dew laden dragonfly…

what’s on your bucket list of shots?

dew not disturb
dew not disturb

What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.

Zig Ziglar

I have an ever-expanding bucket list of photographs that I would like to take in my lifetime. I think having such a list goes hand in hand with seeing opportunities to photograph. I always carry my camera with me just in case a shot presents itself but I also love those times when I can carve out some time just to go find my shot.

Years ago I saw some breathtaking photographs of dew covered insects and ever since then have been on a search to find a dew laden dragonfly. On this morning I opened the door to let my dog out and saw a sparkly dew covered world. Tiny droplets clinging to every surface it seemed… would today be the day?

Pulling on a pair of Boggs and screwing on my macro lens I headed out to my pasture in search of insects and hopefully, just maybe, a dragonfly? It’s not like I haven’t done this before, I have searched high and low for the dragonfly with no success but often the hunt can be just as fun.

I wondered what the neighbors would think if they saw me crouched in the wet grasses peering intently at every strand; getting colder and more damp by the minute! And then I saw it…amidst the lupines, sparkling like a little jeweled ornament, covered from his eyes to his wings in tiny droplets.

Taking care not to disturb him I gently pushed some leaves out-of-the-way to photograph him and then replaced them afterwards. They are quite vulnerable in this condition, unable to fly until their wings dry and I checked back from time to time to watch the progress until he finally flew away.

Getting a chance at a shot that you’ve been searching for is exhilarating but as is human nature I just want to do it again!

I would love to hear in a comment what’s on your bucket list of shots and in the meantime I’m going out to watch for a heron in flight carrying a twig for his nest!