Scars…

from a different viewpoint.


All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another.

Anatole France

On a recent flight my seatmate was a woman slightly older than myself but as you do in close quarters, we began to chat. Summing up your life history in a few short sentences is somewhat freeing. Each time you share your story, even if it’s with someone you’re likely never to see again, it opens the door to healing scars that may not be visible from the outside.

Gazing out over the mountains below she spoke with regret of the place where she had gotten married, a place that I have been to on several occasions and each time have been seduced by its beauty.

You see it burned in the fall of 2017, 19,303 hectares in the park itself. She said it was now ugly, it would never be the same, and she likely would not return. I was surprised by that reaction, so at odds with my own. I shared some images with her that I had taken over the last two years but where I saw signs of strength and survival she saw only haunting scars.

She’s a breast cancer survivor and I couldn’t help but wonder what she feels about herself when she confronts a mirror. When I see scars, especially devastating ones, I always think of the strength that it must have taken to push beyond that and to survive.

Change is a good thing. It gives us the opportunity to create a new narrative and to perhaps do a better job when we tell the next story.

Be optimistic, be brave, and most of all be kind.


2 thoughts on “Scars…”

  1. Wise words. On Apr 1, 2019 10:09 AM, “it’s (almost always) about the water…” wrote:

    > sherylrgarrison posted: ” from a different viewpoint. All changes, even > the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is > a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another. > Anatole France On a recent flight my seatmate wa” >

  2. I absolutely love your perspective! Always, always, it is shored up with the right image…and yet I know that you like to capture the image first and the words flow afterwards…
    I once saw a catalogue of monochrome images of breast-cancer scars. The project was named “Scar”. It was a deeply poignant and beautiful collection, and yes, it spoke so eloquently of the fighting spirit of these women.

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