Dew laden dragonfly…

what’s on your bucket list of shots?

dew not disturb
dew not disturb

What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.

Zig Ziglar

I have an ever-expanding bucket list of photographs that I would like to take in my lifetime. I think having such a list goes hand in hand with seeing opportunities to photograph. I always carry my camera with me just in case a shot presents itself but I also love those times when I can carve out some time just to go find my shot.

Years ago I saw some breathtaking photographs of dew covered insects and ever since then have been on a search to find a dew laden dragonfly. On this morning I opened the door to let my dog out and saw a sparkly dew covered world. Tiny droplets clinging to every surface it seemed… would today be the day?

Pulling on a pair of Boggs and screwing on my macro lens I headed out to my pasture in search of insects and hopefully, just maybe, a dragonfly? It’s not like I haven’t done this before, I have searched high and low for the dragonfly with no success but often the hunt can be just as fun.

I wondered what the neighbors would think if they saw me crouched in the wet grasses peering intently at every strand; getting colder and more damp by the minute! And then I saw it…amidst the lupines, sparkling like a little jeweled ornament, covered from his eyes to his wings in tiny droplets.

Taking care not to disturb him I gently pushed some leaves out-of-the-way to photograph him and then replaced them afterwards. They are quite vulnerable in this condition, unable to fly until their wings dry and I checked back from time to time to watch the progress until he finally flew away.

Getting a chance at a shot that you’ve been searching for is exhilarating but as is human nature I just want to do it again!

I would love to hear in a comment what’s on your bucket list of shots and in the meantime I’m going out to watch for a heron in flight carrying a twig for his nest!

 

In your search for the next great image…

don’t forget to capture the moment.

a moment
touch

We do not remember days, we remember moments.

Cesare Pavese

As a landscape photographer I am often guilty of not capturing my own life and those special family moments within it.

I am the one who goes on a trip with family or friends and can count on one hand the number of images with those people in it. Granted, I find people to be not the most cooperative of subjects and in today’s world many prefer those in the moment ‘selfies’ that they take with their iphones or ipads!

There are special moments though that should not be passed up and on this day I was present enough to recognize that and to capture what was right in front of me.

Henry, a 14 year old Staffordshire Bull Terrier, was one of the great joys of our life. He was funny, incorrigible, uncooperative at best, and oddly enough always smelled like hay?!

This image was taken in the last months of his life and I treasure it for so many reasons. I was sitting on the steps, camera in my lap, having just been out photographing some winter snowfall. Henry had been marching around barking at the roof plops, that snow that slides in an avalanche fashion off of metal roofs after the sun comes out, when his Dad came home from work.

There was a lot of barking and wiggling around and then I think my heart broke just a little as his hands supported this old dog who leaned into the sun and took in the love that he had always known…

click

and then he was gone.

What is it about artists…

and old barns?

the old barn
the old barn

I search for the realness, the real feeling of a subject, all the texture around it…I always want to see the third dimension of something…I want to come alive with the object.

Andrew Wyeth

Perhaps it’s my years spent working on old wooden boats but I too find myself drawn to these old, dilapidated structures that were once filled with life and now lie vacant, slowly returning to the ground upon which they were built.

This particular barn stands fairly close to the edge of a road that I travel frequently and one could easily miss it as it sits sheltered by the trees that have grown up alongside it.

It was a typical fall morning. The kind when the cold overnight temperatures have dropped a shroud of fog onto the landscape below. As the sun gained strength the light became quite soft and beautiful. The foliage had a deep saturated color and the nearby water shone with subtle reflections. For me it was an opportunity not to be missed.

I love to use the in camera multiple exposure feature not to fill the outline of a person’s head with leaves as is more commonly seen, but to use it for more subtle qualities. I love the painterly effects that it can imbue on an image and I hurried to paint this old barn with my camera.

I will often return home from photographing with images that I did not plan on. Part of living an artistic life is being prepared to capture what is presented to you on a daily basis. Whatever your medium, carry at least part of it with you at all times and when you see a moment, you can react to it with spontaneity and make it come alive!

Haleakala…

where the demigod Maui snared the sun and forced it to move more slowly across the sky.

sunrise on Haleakala
sunrise on Haleakala

The grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never dried all at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor is ever rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal dawn and gloaming, on sea and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.

John Muir

It seemed like the right thing to do, after all I have had a lot of practice lately at getting up after midnight and chasing the night sky so the alarm was set and at 2 AM we began our journey to the 10,023 foot summit of a volcano called Haleakala.

I would not have imagined packing my winter down, snowboard under layers and wool hat for a trip to Hawaii but I was really glad that I had! Bundled up and with a Pepsi and pretzels in hand to combat the nausea that I deal with on winding mountain roads, into the Jeep we piled.

The drive was as curvy and slow as reported so we were glad that we had gotten such an early start. Upon arrival we made our way up top and I found a good place to set up my tripod, thankfully weighted down by my gear bag as it was cold and breezy.

It was a full moon night but I was still pleased to be able to see the milky way with my naked eye and took some shots of it while we waited for the main event. I think that this was the first time ever for me photographing the night sky with a group of people and I do mean group! Those of us braving the weather outside had a chuckle at the expense of the ones who looked a little like caged animals staring out from the enclosed and far warmer viewing area; snapping pictures from behind the glass with their flashes on.

enclosed viewing area
enclosed viewing area

Being surrounded by some wonderful people from other parts of the world helped to pass the time as my fingers (gloved) froze and my kneecaps shook. Thank God for remotes so I didn’t have to touch my camera!

For me the best part of a sunrise is always the time before it comes up and the continuous line of vehicles driving up added some lovely trails to the night sky images. The main event was a moving experience as the sun rose over a bank of clouds and the audience could be heard to say a collective aaahhhhh. 

Haleakala sunrise
light trails from cars on Haleakala

Haleakala, house of the sun, I will remember you…

 

 

On the island of Maui…

my time spent with Honu.

chelonia mydas
chelonia mydas

No water, no life. No blue, no green.

Sylvia Earle

As I prepare to go on an adventure, whether it be in my back yard or thousands of miles away, I try not to have expectations about what I will photograph but rather be ready for anything that comes along. Words from a very wise friend of mine filter through my consciousness “Sheryl, expectations are unfulfilled resentments“.

Expectations are not to be confused with preparations though…I had an abundance of preparation! The first thing that I packed was my camera bag which I took as my carry-on luggage and every inch of that bag was carefully analyzed and utilized.

As I walked along the rocky shores of the beach as the tide was coming in, I caught my first glimpse of the head of the largest of the sea turtles, the green turtle.

green turtle with red algae
green turtle with red algae

They were a joy to watch as they surfed the incoming tide to snatch mouthfuls of algae from the rocks. I spent hours watching them and waiting for those few chances to catch them as the water swept out from under them leaving them momentarily high and dry. The gracefulness was unexpected as they maneuvered through the waves; diving for three to five minutes at a time and then surfacing to breathe for a short one to three seconds. I got the feeling that they enjoyed the ‘water slide’ feel of the water rushing them back out to sea. To get a feel for their size; the carapace can measure up to five feet and they can weigh between two to five hundred pounds.

I can’t help but feel sadness that these beautiful, herbivorous creatures are listed as an endangered species but feel gladness that steps have been taken to ensure their survival. I will treasure my time spent with them.